Chapter’s Annotation

CHAPTERS’ ANNOTATION 5

Chapter’sAnnotation

Chapter’sAnnotation

Morrell,M., &amp Capparell, S. (2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessonsfrom the great Antarctic explorer. New York, N.Y: Penguin.

Morelland Capparell’s chapter 6 on “formingteams through assignments”asserts the importance of creating cracker- jack groups that canhandle robust challenges. Give the most challenging assignments togroup members who do not complain about work. However, inform thatyou are aware of the task’s magnitude and you are counting on theirexcellent stamina to get the task done. The authors assert theimportance of training and empowering team leaders to enhance theirability to lead while focusing on the group objectives. In addition,leaders should sacrifice by giving rewards to outstanding groupmembers to enhance performance. Group leaders should show poise tomembers working on their behalf. It is vital for support members tomaintain the same level of exemplary performance even in yourabsence. Finally, do not point out individual weaknesses during groupassignments, allows each group member to contribute in their ownunique way in achieving group goals.

Morelland Capparell offer solution and advice on how groups can beeffectively used to carry out assignments. The authors assert on theimportance of showing gratitude and rewarding outstanding groupmembers as a motivation to enhance performance. The ideas in thechapter are systematic and well put down to facilitate comprehensionof the subject. The authors use a simple language while referring toreal life situations, making it easy for readers to implement theideas in their daily practices. I recommend the chapter ideas to beincorporated in school systems and encourage students to participatein team works.

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton MifflinCompany.

Napier andGershenfeld’s chapter 9 on “The evolution of groups,” emphasizethat groups take time to evolve into teams. As a result, theorganization and team members need to invest and support the group’sgrowth and progress. The authors assert that during the group’sforming stage, the members feel discomfort arising from personal egoexperienced when people form new relationships. The group graduallyevolves into the storming stage where the members are free toquestion the authority, react to demands on what is to e done andfeel comfortable to work in their capacity. The norming stage is whenthe group develops rules and regulations to be adhered to by allmembers. Finally, in the performing stage, members focus on achievinggroup objectives through innovations and teamwork. The authors arguethat during the evolution stages, group leaders should exercisepatience and allow the members to pass through all the stages.

Napier andGershenfeld offer advice on how group leaders should handle the groupmembers during the evolution process. The authors advice group leaderto exercise patience and not restrain the evolution stages becausestages that are skipped or rushed often show up later and the resultsare disastrous. The authors use simple language making it easy forstudents to comprehend the content. The ideas in the chapter arearranged in a systematic manner and a sharply delineated manner. Thelisting style makes the reading faster and deeper, making the booksuitable for students and professionals.

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton MifflinCompany.

In chapter10 “Fromgroup to team: the evolution of working teams in organizationallife,” Napier and Gershenfeld explain how teams are formed. Teamsare mature groups where accountability and leadership is collective.In organizations, teams comprises of groups of workers assignedvarious administrative responsibilities by the managers. Team membersin organizations share responsibilities and are focused on theassigned tasks, growth and outcome. The authors point out thatalthough teams work collectively, it is vital to point out the roleof each team member should be clearly defined. Napier and Gershenfeldemphasize that team leaders should remember that all members work asindividuals with unique contributions. As a result, leaders shouldlearn to deal with each group member distinctively

Napier andGershenfeld offer insight on the role of teams in organizations. Theauthors present their arguments in a professional manner coupled withnarrations and stories on real time events. The stories enablereaders especially students to invoke efficient foundation thatsupports problem solving. The authors make use of numbered lists tohighlight the main points, making reading faster and easy tocomprehend. Napier and Gershenfeld use narrations and real lifestories, making it easy for readers to connect the chapter readingwith real life experiences. The chapter is written in simple languagemaking it easy to read and comprehend, hence suitable for studentsprofessional and business leaders. I recommend this book as amandatory literature for leadership classes.

References

Morrell,M., &amp Capparell, S. (2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessonsfrom the great Antarctic explorer. New York, N.Y: Penguin.

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton MifflinCompany.

Chapters’ annotation

CHAPTERS’ ANNOTATION 6

Chapters’Annotation

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton Mifflin

Napierand Gershenfeld’s chapter on leadership defines the types ofleadership styles, theories, and traits of a leader. The authorshighlight the three major leadership deficiencies whereby leadershipand ethics exist in different vacuums. In addition, leadership is atop- down structure where leaders create policies and plans executedby followers. Napier and Gershenfeld propose a new leadership stylewhere ethic and morals guide leaders. Effective leaders guided bymoral and ethics realize organizational goals and objectives.However, different circumstances call for different leadership stylesto achieve organizational goals. Value- based leaders’ exhibitvalues such as trustworthiness and honesty. Such leaders easily gainthe trust of their followers and organizational goals are realizedthrough trust and loyalty. Principle-centered leaders advocate forsense and meaning in whatever they do. Moral leadership instillsresponsibility, which in turn unleashes human potential. Thereforeleaders are responsible for setting organizational visions based onmorals and values. Transformational leaders marshal followers toadopt collectiveness which facilitates realization of goals. Goodleadership allow groups to express opinion and dissatisfaction, andis ready to make sound judgment even in intricate situations.

Napierand Gershenfeld’s text offers insight into different forms ofleadership and how each is bale to realize the group vision. Theauthors present their argument in a systematic manner using simplelanguage. The text highlights examples from historical leadershipstyles, making it easy for readers to connect the reading into reallife situation. The chapter should be incorporated into schoolcurriculums as it aid in shaping future leadership traits. Thechapter is a must read for organization leaders, business owners andstudents.

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton Mifflin

Napierand Gershenfeld’s “A systems views of small group behavior”explores theories surround systems and system change in groups andorganizations. The chapter surveys the historical presumptions andtheir roles in functioning of systems. The authors illustrate theimportance of developing organizational and group systemsperspectives. Further, the chapter looks at the complex repercussionsof changing group and organizational systems. The chapter highlightsthe general systems theories practiced by organizations. The theoriessystems theory enables groups and organizations to see the importanceof interrelationships in work setting. System ideologies are vitalbecause they reinforce and expand supra-individual theories beyondpersonal thinking. System analysis increases the focus level ofgroups as they progress.

Napierand Gershenfeld are aware of challenges facing organizations andgroups. The chapter offers insight on the various group systemconjectures. The chapter highlights both historical and current groupsystem theories in a logical manner that makes it easy for readers tocomprehend. The text is valuable to readers because it offers anhonest perspective to group systems theories and how they can beadopted to propel organizations to a higher level. The chapter iswell laid out and the points are sharply defined making it easy andexciting to read. Although the discussed theories are not new, theauthors deliver their arguments in a scholarly manner coupled withpractical examples, making it easy for readers to understand. Thetext should be adopted in school curriculum because it addressesproblems facing contemporary institutions. Students and professionalsshould find Napier and Gershenfeld’s writing style both enjoyableand engaging.

Morrell,M., &amp Capparell, S. (2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessonsfrom the great Antarctic

Chapter4 of Morrell and Capparell’s book, “getting the best from eachindividual” illustrates how to reap maximum benefits employees. Theauthors assert the importance of creating a comfortable workenvironment as the first step in enhancing productivity. Employeesshould be encouraged to be in good physical shape by eating balanceddiets, exercising and getting enough rest. Employers and supervisorsshould keenly observe their employees and match work responsibilitieswith personality. In addition, employees should be given imperativeand challenging tasks to make even the lowest ranking worker fellrespected and valuable to the company. Morrell and Capparellemphasize the importance of feedbacks, rewards and appreciation ofall employees.

Morrelland Capparell offer sound advice to organizations seeking to achievemaximum benefit from their employees. The authors present solutionsto management dilemmas facing contemporary companies. The chapterillustrates that excellent management systems can enhance employeeproductivity, which is reflected in increased profits. The authorspresent their ideas in a systematic and logical manner making it easyfor students and professional to comprehend the ideas. In addition,the chapter is written using an easy language and the use of reallife examples make it easy to read and connect with real lifesituations. I find the text suitable for organization leaders,employers and students planning to work in managerial positions inthe future. The book’s chapter should be included in schoolcurriculums for leadership, management and entrepreneurship classes.

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References

Morrell,M., &amp Capparell, S. (2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessonsfrom the great Antarctic

Napier,R., &amp Gershenfeld, M. K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience.Boston: Houghton Mifflin