Education Theories

EducationTheoriesNameInstitutionDate

EducationTheories

Inclusioninvolvesintegratingboth thenon-disabledandthedisabledstudentsin thesameclassroom regardlessof thespecialattentiontheymay be demanding.Themaingoalof inclusionis to ensurethedisabledstudentshavean opportunityto takepartin therestrictiveworldandgainas muchas theycan socially,emotionally andacademically with thenon-disabled students.Instructional settingsmay be involvedwherethespecialneedsstudentsare consideredin a regularclassroom, havingthegeneralised educationteacher,specialisededucationteacherandpossiblya parentoranyvolunteerin thecommunity(Wiebe &amp Kim, 2008).

Improvingtheacademicpositionin an inclusionclassis mucheasier.Someof thebestteacherscan bemadefromthestudentsthemselves. Thisispossiblethrough cooperativelearning.Cooperativelearningis veryinvolving as socialinteractionis applicableamongst thestudents(Slavin, 2009).Feeding of knowledgeamong thestudentsispromotedby thesocialinteractionsandtheactivesharingof experiencesof thestudents.Thisimprovesthelevel of understandingof thesespecialneedsstudentsas theydevelopan attitudethattheycan doas wellas whattheir peershavetaughtthem. In additionto this,learningfrom eachotherdevelopsa senseof belonging,responsibility,andpridewithinthemselves (Wills, 2007).

Workingtogether,thestudentsin an inclusionclassgetpairedup, thustheslowlearningstudentsgeta chanceto workalongside thefastlearningones,andthisbuildstheir confidencewith time.Studentswith disabilitiesbenefit much from peer tutoring(McDuffie, Mastropieri, &amp Scruggs, 2009).

Ina classwhereinclusionis thecentred wayof education,studentsandteachersdointeract. Thisprovidesa platformwherethespecialneedsstudentscan shareandcommunicatetheir variouschallenges.Thismakesstudentsunderstandeachother,andthenon-disabled studentandteacherscan knowthebasis,orthestartingpointtowards helpingthem solvethechallenge.Through thesocialinteractions,thespecialneedsstudentsnot onlyacquireknowledgefrom their teachers,butalsoacquiredesiredbehavioursfrom their classmates. Thedisablestudentsin such an inclusionclasswill feelencouraged,comfortable,andlessembarrassedamong their peerssince theyknowtheyare in a positionto overcometheir disabilities.

Emotionalsupportof thespecialneedsstudentsis keyin anylearninginstitution.Thisisbecauseitis one of thecontributorsof a fullsociallydevelopedpersonorelseitmay actas potentialbarriersto thespecialneedstudents,thereforedevelopinglowself-esteemthat may hinderthem socialwise.Asa resultof repeatedfailurein classworks,somelearnersmay feelacademicoutcomesare uncontrollablethushavea perceptionof beingincompetentcomparedto their peers(Ntshangese, Mdikana &amp Cronk, 2008, p.77) In thatcase,thenon-disabled studentsshould providea leaning shoulderto thespecialneedsstudents.Thisencouragesandmotivatesthem since theyarenot leftwithinthemarginof discrimination,thuswill be moreassert andhavehighself-esteem.

Itisthereforeobservablethatinclusionbenefitsallstudents.Thespecialneedsstudentswill havea chanceto helpandinteractwith thenon-disabled studentsin theclass.Thisbuildspsycheandmoraleto thisstudentlightingup their world,thushelpingthem developsocially,emotionally andacademically. Sometimes,thespecialneedsstudentsonlyrequireattentionandlovefrom theotherstudentsto improvedrastically from one level to anotherin their performance.

References

McDuffie,K., Mastropieri, M., &amp Scuggs,T. (2009).Differential effectsof peertutoringin co-taught andnon-co-taught classes:Results forcontent learningandstudent-teacher interactions.CouncilofExceptional Children, 75(4), 493-510.

Miller,P.H. (2011).Theoriesof developmental psychology(5thed).New York: Worth Publishers.

Ntshangase,S., Mdikana, A., &amp Cronk, C. (2008). Acomparativestudyof self-esteemof adolescentboyswith andwithout learningdisabilities.Internationaljournalof specialEducation, 23(2), 75-84.

WiebeBerry, R., &amp Kim, N. (2008).Exploringteachertalkduring mathematicsinstructionin an inclusionclassroom. Journalof Educational Research, 101(6), 363-378.

Wills,J. (2007). Brain-friendlyStrategiesfortheInclusion Classroom. New York: Barons Press.