Mapping a Route toward Differentiated Instruction

Mappinga Route toward Differentiated Instruction

Mappinga Route toward Differentiated Instruction

AnnTomlinson argues that there are many ways of learning, but thecontent and the essential skills learnt remain the same in herarticle, “Mappinga Route toward Differentiated Instruction.”In other words, there are different routes to the same destination,and it does not matter the route taken as long as one gets to thedestination. According to Tomlinson, it is significant to developacademic responsive especially for a country with equity andexcellence value. Therefore, it is important to using differentiatedinstructions to teaching in order to give students multiple optionsfor absorbing information, as well as making sense of the ideas.Differential instruction is the process that ensures what thestudents learns, how they learn it, or how they demonstrate itcorresponds to their readiness level, preferred mode of learning, andinterests. This process ensures the students, in regardless of theirability, acquire content, process it, construct it, and make sense ofideas out of it.

Inthe article, Tomlinson gives an example of Mr. Appleton, Mrs Baker,and Ms. Cassel, who teach about ancient Rome. However, they all usedifferent teaching methods. Mrs Baker’s class is differentiatedwhile Mr. Appleton’s class is not differentiated. For teaching tobe successful, it requires two elements: students understanding andengagement. Specifically, students understand to make sense of whatthey have learnt. In addition, they should feel engaged in theprocess of learning. Integrating the two elements helps the studentto realise that learning is enjoyable. Comparing the three classes,Mr Appleton’s class lacks student’s engagement hence, studentslack something to make learning appealing. Most students are likelyto memorize data for the purpose of exams only rather thanunderstanding it. On the contrary, Mrs Baker’s class has student’sengagement. It has a learner’s friendly environment that offersstudents and opportunity for student peer work, student movement, andchoice. On the other hand, Ms. Cassell uses differentiatedinstruction. Prior the lessons, she plans the topics to cover, andthe sequence to use. She recognises each student skills, knowledge,and understanding, as well as where they need to improve.