Phonics Help Learners

16

PhonicsHelp Learners

Tableof Contents

EXECUTIVESUMMARY……………………………………………………………………………………………….5

CHAPTERONE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………6

INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………6

1.1Background to the Study…………………………………………………………………………………………….6

1.2Statement of the Problem…………………………………………………………………………………………….7

1.3Purpose of the Study…………………………………………………………………………………………………..7

1.4Research Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………8

1.5Research Questions…………………………………………………………………………………………………….8

1.6Significance of the Study…………………………………………………………………………………………….8

CHAPTERTWO………………………………………………………………………………………………………….10

LITERATUREREVIEW……………………………………………………………………………………………..10

2.1Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………10

2.2Early ReadingIntervention…………………………………………………………………………………………10

2.3Phonics……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………10

CHAPTERTHREE……………………………………………………………………………………………………..12

RESEARCHMETHODOLOGY………………………………………………………………………………….12

3.1Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12

3.2ResearchDesign………………………………………………………………………………………………………..12

3.3Study Population andArea…………………………………………………………………………………………13

3.4Sample Size and SamplingTechnique………………………………………………………………………….13

3.5Data Sources and Data CollectionInstruments……………………………………………………………..14

3.6Limitations to theStudy……………………………………………………………………………………………..14

CHAPTERFOUR………………………………………………………………………………………………………..15

FINDINGS,ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION………………………………………………………15

4.1Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………15

4.2SurveyResults………………………………………………………………………………………………………….15

CHAPTERFIVE………………………………………………………………………………………………………….20

RECOMMENDATION……………………………………………………………………………………….20

REFERENCES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..21

APPENDICES………………………………………………………………………………………………………………25

Abstract

Comprehensionof phonics is integral part of the young readers’ ability inlearning how to read (Gooch and Lambirth, n.d). However, there is noclear procedure that teachers use in delivery of phonic content andskills to students. The purpose of this study is to investigatewhether phonics are helpful to learners, in this case, young readers.In doing so the study will seek to find out whether use of phonicshelp in promoting success of students in reading.

Thepresent study is both a quantitative and qualitative design using theadministration of questionnaires and interviews protocol to collectinformation from parents whose children are in elementary classes.Qualitative research involved recording of informal interview with 3teachers from year 1 , year 5 and year 4 who explained how importantit was to use phonics in teaching reading and writing (Beminger etal., 1988). Further, reading and writing of words in testing thechildren. For the year 8 I assessed them with Edinburgh reading andwriting tests. The participants formed a sample of conveniencecomprising of 16 students who were given questionnaires and carriedthem in a bag for parents to fill. The students were selectedrandomly and the sample comprised of students with low ability. Thedata collected was analyzed by use of codes as each student wasidentified through a code. Results indicate that there are thosechildren that are very good in learning through phonics. They arephonics learners who are, and can do much better. The reading andwriting progress, they thrive, very good readers (Beminger et al.,1988). However in regard to children who are not phonics learners,the teachers and teaching assistants will need a different approachand some different strategies put in place in order for them tothrive or become better in their reading and spelling (Johnston andWatson, 2005).

    1. Background to the Study

Inthe course of 12 weeks, the research takes place in anInternational-Collegiate, a private school which comprises of fourschools. From junior Kindergarten, Primary school, secondary tosenior advanced level college. The school is progressing one with onethousand seven hundred and eighty pupils and therefore there isalways construction going on as they always expect new students everyyear hence new building for accommodation. The Collegiate is one ofthe top five in the UK With the best recreation and sportingfacilities. The office for standards in education (Ofsted), recentlyvisited the Collegiate and report indicates an outstanding Ofsted(2014). The report also highlights that the quality of the teachingin English was outstanding.

Thetitle fully reflects the project under study clearing identifying thepurpose of the research. Phonics represents a means to the process oflearning to read and at the same time its techniques taught in classare not intended to be ends in themselves alone. It is an importantaid to word identification hung when used together with other skillsand ability to recognize and pronounce unfamiliar words as part ofthe reading program.

Pupilsmaster these skills steadily as they grow but not all of themsuccessfully attain them. A research done by a teacher who tried toexamine the effectiveness of phonics as a teaching tool came into aconclusion that some students are phonetic learners whereas some arenot because of their different learning style (Perfetti et al.,1987).

    1. Statement of the Problem

Readingis a critical part of any life and the elementary school teachingfocuses on proper reading in the schools (Rose, 2006). The importanceof phonics is clear in the teaching of children as it forms asuccessful part of reading programs. Nonetheless, the absorption andcomprehension of students is different owing to their differentcognitive abilities. Incorporation of phonics in reading programs isa successful method used to teach phonics. However, in some cases,phonics are taught in separate with reading hence the students arenot as successful as expected(Ellis,Hatcher &amp Hulme, 1994).

Ininstances where reading is connected to phonics, students acquireessential skills that are not learned solely learnt through phonicsinstruction. Additionally, incorporation of phonics into readingprograms is much effective in teaching of students to decode certainwords(Lapp&amp Flood, 1997).Theimportance of phonics among the young readers is unquestionable owingto the immense benefits that come with it. The students who are ableto acquire phonics instruction on time have higher reading abilitythan the students who are not exposed to phonics learning in theirearly ages (Ehri, Nunes, Stahl &amp Willows, 2001).

    1. Purpose of Research

Toprovide an overview of benefits of phonics and how it should bedelivered, also to compare use of phonics with non-tutored controlssuch as reading unfamiliar words through analogy whereby one appliesthe knowledge of known words to decode unknown ones. Another methodmay just involving prediction of potential information in the text(Adams et al, 1998).Later on to confirm if students who followedphonics instructions would significantly improve in wordidentifications, increased fluency and spelling (Johnston and Watson,2005). The main aim of the project therefore will be to identify theimpact of phonics in teaching children who participate in a learningenvironment.

    1. Research Aims and Objectives

  1. To carry out a detailed literature review of previous literature on phonics learning among young learners

  2. To establish impact of phonics learning on child’s writing progress

  3. To find out the impact of phonics learning on child’s reading progress

  4. To determine the benefits of phonics learning among young readers

    1. Research Questions

Withmuch attention given to the research aims and objectives outlined inthe previous sections, this study shall be guided by the question,“Is phonics approach important as a method of teaching youngreaders?” To find an answer to this question, answers from severalquestions exploring different aspects of phonics learning among younglearners in different schools shall be joined together to make awhole complete argument from which a credible conclusion can bevalidly drawn. These questions are:

  1. What are the impacts of phonics learning on child’s writing progress?

  2. Are there any impacts of phonics learning on child’s reading progress?

  3. What are the benefits of phonics learning on young readers?

    1. Significance of the Study

Thisstudy is vital on the grounds that integration of phonics guidelineinto reading programs helps improve student reading capacity inelementary school. The California Department of TrainingEnglish/Language Arts structure states &quotkindergarten and firstyear instructors must instruct phonemic mindfulness and phonics totheir understudies&quot (Ball and Blachman, 1991). The structurelikewise expresses that by first year, students ought to have acomprehension of phonics. This study addresses the prerequisites putforward by the system for educators instructing students to read. Thestudy is important for the learners and educators because it willhighlight the impact of Phonics and the areas that need improvementfor better learner outcomes (Kydd, 2013).

  1. Literature Review

    1. Early Reading Intervention

Learningto read is a deep rooted procedure on the other hand, the earlychildhood years serve as a critical establishment for ensuingeducation advancement (Neuman &amp Dickinson, 2003). Youngsters wholearn to read well at an early age will get to be better readers.Then again, those readers who battle in the early years appear todeteriorate and fall further behind (Savage and Carless, 2005).

Albeita few youngsters experience issues learning to read, an accord isdeveloping among specialists that numerous reading issues can beaverted or possibly minimized if mediation happens in the early years(Elliott, Lee, &amp Tollefson, 2001 Good, Simmons, &amp Kameenui,2001). &quotSuccessful mediations can and ought to be made from theget-go a little gathering premise for kids with built danger&quot(Cecil, 2011). Dr. Bennett Shaywitz, M.D., of the Yale UniversitySchool of Medicine, reports that youthful kids who read inadequatelyand don`t get any assistance will inevitably learn to read yet willnever do as such with the same familiarity as do great readers(Cecil, 2011).

Casein point, Dr. Marie Clay, advocates for interceding for readingissues before first year while the accomplishment gap is still smallrather than holding up until kids fall further behind (McCulloch,2000).

    1. Phonics

Notwithstandingearly usage, a large portion of the recent research advocates precisephonics guideline as a discriminating component in effectiveproficiency mediations (Soler and Openshaw, 2006). Systematic phonicsis the sequenced presentation of sound-image connections, organizedaudit and evaluation, and sometimes, controlled readers (Bernsteinand Ellis, 2000). There is an expanding assortment of explorationwhich shows that kids at danger for reading disappointment can beeffective in a reading program that incorporates escalated, complete,unequivocal guideline in phonemic mindfulness, alphabetic standard,word distinguishing proof, and appreciation (Cecil, 2011). TheNational Reading Panel distinguishes phonics as one of the fivestrongest indicators of right on time reading achievement.

  1. Research Methodology

Thischapter advances the method that was used to carry out primary andsecondary research for the study. A detailed description of theprocess and outline that the author went through to get access toinformation as well as answers to research questions is provided. Theresearch aims at establishing whether the use and integration ofphonics among young readers is helpful. This section describes theresearch design used, target population, sampling design and size,the data collection instruments, data analysis employed andinterpretation tools. In order to carry out this research, deductivereasoning shall be employed as posited by Creswell (2003). Deductivereasoning will attempt to get conclusions from things that are knownto be true. Thus, the study will use explanatory approach wherequalitative and quantitative research methods shall be integrated. The explanatory design approach used will ensure that variables usedin the study have a relationship. The research will rely on bothprimary and secondary data collection techniques.

    1. Research Design

Thisresearch used both quantitative and qualitative design withadministration of questionnaires and interview protocols usedrespectively. A cross-sectional research survey was used to helpcreate a relationship between phonics learning and impacts on readingand writing of young learners (Beminger et al., 1988). In thisstudy, there are dependent and independent variables. The phonicsinstructions are the independent variables and reading and writingachievements are the dependent variables. These variables form the IVand DV equations for the study.

    1. Study Population and Area

16pupils will be participating in the project research, aged between 5and 13. Amongst them, 8 are boys and 8 are girls, this includes 4from reception class who are of Cohort 2020 meaning that they theyear group will be moving from Chapter House school to Kings Magna.In this International school year 6 is done in high school. Alsoincluded are 4 year 1 who are Cohort 2019, 4 EAL pupils from year 2,Cohort 2018, 4 from year 5 who are Cohort 2015, and 4 dyslexic pupilsfrom year 8 (Alexander et al, 1991).

Therewill also be three teachers that will be involved in the project, whowill help in supervision and also give a brief interview regardingtheir views on usage of phonics in teaching. Input of the teacherswill provide the opportunity to gain varying perspectives. It isexpected that this will be particularly useful during situationsrequiring the observation of human interactions and behavior (Cohenet al., 2007). The parents of the pupils who will be involved in theresearch will be invited to provide their views and opinions. Thiswill provide a further viewpoint which will allow for triangulationof the findings (Bell, 2010).

    1. Sample size and Sampling Technique

Thisstudy will include 16 pupils aged between the years 5 to 13. Thegender division of this study will include 8 boys and 8 girls whichinclude 4 from reception class who are made up of cohort 2020 meaningthat it is the year the group will be transiting from Chapter Houseschool to King’s Magna. In this school, year 6 of learning is donein high school. The other part of the sample include 4 individualsfor year 1 who form Cohort 2019, 4 EAL pupils who are in year 2,Cohort 2018. Additionally, there are 4 from year 5 who form Cohort2015 and 4 dyslexic pupils from year 8. In the study, there will alsobe three teachers who will guide and assist in supervision (Alexanderet al., 1991). The teachers are additionally tasked to carry outinterviews in regards to the views on the use of phonics in teaching.The inputs from the teachers will be significant as they are expectedto provide opportunity to get different and varying perspectives.Thus, the varying perspectives are expected to be useful insituations that demand the observations of human interactions andbehavior (Cohen et al., 2007). Parents involved in the study will beinvited to provide their views and opinions. Thus, through this,triangulation of the findings will take effect (Bell, 2010).

    1. Data Sources and Data Collection Methods

Primarydata was the principle source. Information from the field wasacquired through the use of questionnaires where the respondentsfilled after precise and secured scholastic systems.

    1. Limitations of the Study

  1. Bias from the respondents to just fill the surveys to satisfy the specialist. The specialist directed a face to face interview to elucidate the reason and target of the study.

  2. The way the survey was outlined may restrain extra reaction. This was however moderated through provoking the respondents to give more data.

  1. Findings and Discussions

Thischapter presents results and findings from both primary and secondaryresearch. The primary research results were obtained from analysis ofdata collected using the questionnaire outlined in appendix (1.). Thesecondary research results presented here in below are findings madeby previous researchers concerning some aspects of the subject underinvestigation. As explained in the previous chapter, secondaryresearch was necessitated by the need to provide some contextualaspects and historical data on the subject under investigation. Hencethe secondary research will complement the primary research byproviding contextual evidence from previous studies.

Thispart exhibits the results of the study and translation of findings.The section included three segments. First section shows the samplequalities appearing, level of training, employment tenure, age groupsand level of management. The presentation starts with a depiction ofthe sample attributes utilizing recurrence arrangement. The secondsegment of the section presents facts on the relationship between thestudy variables utilizing the correlation lattice. Segment threeexhibits the results of the effect of the free variable on thedependent variable utilizing the regression analysis.

    1. Survey Results

Atotal of 16 questionnaires were sent and returned for the study whileduly filled. Of all the 16 questionnaires sent, all of them werereturned hence representing response rate of 100%. This response rateis a success especially considering that time limit was a factor andthe respondents were able to complete and give back thequestionnaires. The success is attributable to the cooperation ofparents and the good parent-teacher relationship. Additionally, thestudents are disciplined and well-mannered hence they were able todeliver the questionnaires without any interference. The datacollected from the questionnaires were analyzed and all calculationsfor the responses presented. The data is presented using variousstatistical methods of data presentations. Brief elaborations of thedata collected were presented.

Whenasked about the child’s progress in reading as a result ofintegration of phonics

Myproject findings reached a conclusion that there are those childrenthat are very good in learning through phonics. They are phonicslearners who are, and can do much better. The reading and writingprogress, they thrive, very good readers (Beminger et al., 1988).

Howeverin regard to children who are not phonics learners, the teachers andteaching assistants will need a different approach and some differentstrategies put in place in order for them to thrive or become betterin their reading and spelling (Johnston and Watson, 2005) . The factbeing that they were actually still weak in spelling after so mucheffort put in teaching them through step by step by use ofmulti-sensory learning of reading and writing , their assessmentresults , showed minimal or no improvement at all (Beminger et al.,1988).

Inthis regards, there are those who perceive reading as mainly visualhence the study of eye movements as well as reading speed in order toexpand eye-span printed word intake. Some people consider reading asundertaking fluent, accurate word pronunciation, ultimately focusingon phonics instruction in the relationship between letter and sound(Bernstein and Ellis, 2000). However, in this study little attentionis given to reading as a mechanism for putting together expertise,experience and knowledge, hence reflecting o what is written in orderto create a relationship other facades of life (Beminger et al.,1988). This wider perception considers established spoken as well asliterate language levels which are used to build the skills ofreference, inference and coherence. By actively engaging in readingwe can extend our horizons, expand personal interests, gain deeperand better insight into issues and have ability of understandingourselves, others and the world at large.

Aresearch carried out in American Schools entailing a sample of 218students, Hannaford (1995) takes note that the individuals whoharbored strong command of language, better verbal capabilities, andexcellent linear processing were identified and recognized byteachers as talented individuals (Perfetti et al., 1987). On theother hand, individuals with weaker verbal abilities and lateralprocessing in most cases were treated as individuals having specialeducational needs (Jama and Dugdale, 2012). The left brain mainlyreferred to as linear dominant processors in most instances focusmainly on the sounds, words and structure of sentences (Bernstein andEllis, 2000). Usually, they are a sign of more adeptness at the useof logic in mathematics problems. Additionally, they are able toemploy specific and extensive details in other subjects apart frommathematics and thus able to cope with phonic emphasis upon reading.On the other hand, the right-brained also known as the lateralprocessors, usually are able to picture out things clearly, get theemotional connections, able to intuitively comprehend issues andultimately learn through movement as well as get hands-on experience.Thus, these individuals prefer to approach issues wholesome, in broadoutline and they explore and play and feel their responses. Thus,this group of persons needs to be supported a great deal with detailsand logical processing.

  1. Recommendations

Fromthe study, it is evident that there to have phonics integrated intothe reading program of pupils for them to become stronger readers(Herrera et al., 1997). Thus, schools should strive to have theirpupils learn phonetic patterns and concepts at early stages to enablethem decode words easily when it comes to reading.

Forfurther in-depth inquiry in this field, it is recommended that moretime be allotted for administering questionnaires as well as carryingout interviews. The sample could be made larger so as to berepresentative enough. Further, an extension of the research could bemade in this area by the researcher accumulating data that rangesfrom kindergarten to second year and also including the awarenesspart of the study (Ball and Blachman, 1991).

Futureresearch should aim at comparing the different learning levels, thirdyear classes. The comparison can be based on the use of basal readingprogram and another using direct phonics instruction to know howactive students are involved in the learning process.

ReferenceList

Adams,M. J., Foorman, B. R., Lundberg, L, &amp Beeler, T. (1998). PhonemicAwareness in Young Children. Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H. BrookesPublishing Co.

Alexander,A. W., Andersen, H. G., Heilman, P. C., VoeUer, K. S., &ampTorgesen, J. K. (1991). Phonological awareness training andremediation of analytic decoding deficits in a group of servedyslexies. Annals of Dyslexia. 41,193 – 205.

Ball,E. W. &amp Blachman B. A., (1991). Does phoneme awareness trainingin kindergarten make a difference in early word recognition anddevelopmental spelling? Reading Research Quarterly, 26(1), 49-66.

Beminger,V. W., Proctor, A., DeBruyn, I,. &amp Smith, R. ( 1988).Relationship between levels of oral and written language in beginningreaders. Tournai of School Psychology, 26,341-357.

Bernstein,L. &amp Ellis, N., (2000, Fall). There are three sounds in the wordCAT: How phonemic awareness works to facilitate reading acquisition.Dominican University of California School of Education.

Cecil,N. L. (2011). Striking a balance: A comprehensive approach to earlyliteracy. Scottsdale, AZ: Holcomb Hathaway

Creswell,J. W. (2003). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixedmethod approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. RetrievedApril 27, 2015 from&lthttp://books.google.com.my/books?hl=en&amplr=&ampid=F8BFOM8DCKoC&ampoi=fnd&amppg=PA209&ampdq=Creswell,+J.+W.+%282003%29.+Research+design:+Qualitative,+quantitative,+and+mixed+method+approaches.+Thousand+Oaks,+CA:+Sage+Publications.&ampots=gTgSuzvuRe&ampsig=0zj1Y7bc4VdjFEsOyBtbGm33pSw&ampredir_esc=y#v=onepage&ampq&ampf=false&gt

DfE(2011a) The Importance of Phonics: Securing Confident Reading.London: Department for Education.

DfE(2011b) Funding for phonics teaching to improve children’s reading.http://bit.ly/194V412(accessed 24th April 2015).

DfE(2012) Criteria for assuring high-quality phonic work. Teaching andlearning: pedagogy and practice.

Ehri,L. C., Nunes, S. R., Stahl, S. A., &amp Willows, D. M. (2001).Systematic phonics instruction helps students learn to read: Evidencefrom the national reading panel`s meta-analysis. Review ofEducational Research, 71(3), 393-447. Retrieved from&lthttp://www.jstor.org/stable/3516004&gton 26thApril, 2015.

Ellis,A. W. Hatcher, C &amp P. J., Hulme. (1994). Ameliorating earlyreading failure by integrating the teaching of reading andphonological skills: The phonological linkage hypothesis. ChildDevelopment, 65(1), 41-57. Retrieved from &lthttp://web.ebscohost.com&gton 25thApril, 2015.

Gillon,G., &amp Dodd, B. ( 1995). The effects of training phonological,semantic, and syntactic processing skills in spoken language onreading ability. Language. Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools,26.58 – 68.

Gooch&amp A. Lambirth (Eds.), Understanding phonics and the teaching ofreading: Critical perspectives (pp. 75-87). Buckingham, GBR: OpenUniversity Press. Retrieved April 26, 2015, from&lthttp://site.ebrary.com/lib/dominicanuc/Doc?id=id10229870&ampppg=86.&gt

Griffith,P. L. &amp Klesius, J. P. (1999). The effect of phonemic awarenessability and reading instructional approach on first grade children’sacquisition of spelling and decoding skills. Presented at the meetingof the National Reading Conference, Miami, Florida.

Herrera,J. A., Logan, C. H., Cooker, P. G., M orris, D. P., &amp Lyman, D.E. ( 1997). Phonological awareness and phonetic-graphic conversion: Astudy of the effects of two intervention paradigms with learningdisabled children. Learning disability or learning difference?Reading Improvement, 34(2), 71-89.

Jama,D. and Dugdale, G. (2012) Literacy: State of the Nation. A picture ofliteracy in the UK today. London: National Literacy Trust.

Johnston,R. and Watson, J. (2005) The Effects of Synthetic Phonics Teaching onReading and Spelling Attainment: a Seven Year Longitudinal Study &lthttp://www.scotland.gov.uk/library5/education/sptrs.pdf(accessed 28 April 2015).&gt

Kydd,D. (2013) Phlipping Phonics. Love Learning. http://bit.ly/H1y74P(accessed 25th April

2015).

Lambirth,A. (2008). Teacher’s voices: Talking about children and learning toread. In K.

McCulloch,Myrna T. (2000).Helping children learn “phonemic” and graphemic”awareness. The Riggs Institute, Opinion Papers

Nation,K. &amp Hulme, C. ( 1997). Phonemic segmentation, not onsetrimesegmentation, predicts early reading and spelling skills. ReadingResearch Quarterly , 32 (2), 154-167.

Perfetti,C. A ., Black, I., Bell, L. C., &amp Hughes, C. ( 1987). Phonemicknowledge and learning to read are reciprocal: A longitudinal studyof first grade children. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly. 33 (3), 283-319.

Rose,J. (2006) Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading: FinalReport. London: Department for Education.

Savage,R., &amp Carless, S. (2005). Learning support assistants can delivereffective reading interventions for ‘at-risk’ children.Educational Research, 47(1), 45-61

SolerJ. and Openshaw R. (2006). Literacy Crises and Reading Policies:Children still can’t read! London: Routledge.

Staal,S. A. Saying the &quot p &quot word: Nine guidelines for exemplaryphonics instruction. The Reading Teacher. 45(8), 618-625.

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APPENDICES

TOALL GUARDIANS / PARENTS.

DearSirMadam

Weare interested in your views on classroom reading and writing in yourchild’s school. We would ask you to complete the shortquestionnaire below. Names are not necessary here. All informationwill be treated in the strictest confidence, with questionnaires seenby the research team only.

Mychild is in class: ……… My child is a: Boy ٱ Girlٱ

Mychild’s age is: …… years …… months

Thisis my first child at the school YES / NO

Howmany children are in your family: …….. Please give their ages:……………………………..

1.I was told how reading and writing are taught in my child’s class:

Beforethey started school YES / NO

Afterthey started school YES / NO

2.This information was easy to understand: YES / NO

3.My child receives support with his/her:

ReadingYES / NO

WritingYES / NO

Ifyes, please explain (e.g. Reading Recovery):

__

4.How writing is taught in the school suits my child: YES / NO

(Pleasegive details)

__

5.My child’s progress in reading is: (pleasetick appropriate box)

VeryGood

Good

QuiteGood

Poor

Ifpoor please tell us your concerns:

__

6.My child’s progress in writing is: (pleasetick appropriate box)

VeryGood

Good

QuiteGood

Poor

Ifpoor please tell us your concerns:

__

7.Please answer with the appropriate response for each statement.

(Always/Often /Sometimes /Seldom /Never)

Reading

Mychild likes reading

Mychild needs help to read

Mychild likes me to read to him/her

Mychild reads without stopping

Mychild reads books other than school books

Mychild is a confident reader

Writing

Mychild writes with confidence

Mychild enjoys writing

Mychild needs help to write

Mychild is a good speller

8.Does the school use a particular approach to reading and writing? YES/ NO

9.Has this benefited your child’s:

a.Reading performance YES / NO

b.Writing performance YES / NO

(Pleasegive details)

__

Anyother comments:

Thankyou for taking the time to complete this questionnaire

II.Letter

DearMrs Kilkeny…………

RE:STUDY ON PHONICS

Iwould like to request for your permission to engage some of thestudents in my upcoming study on the importance of phonics approachas a method of teaching young readers. The study is important for thelearners and educators because it will highlight the impact ofPhonics and the areas that need improvement for better learneroutcomes.

Datagathered from whole class tests will be subject to statisticalanalysis, this will facilitate a comparison of pupil’s preintervention reading level with their post intervention level andalso determine whether the changes noted in reading attainment aresustained over the summer period.

Atthis stage of the project, it is considered essential to match theexperimental schools in the programme with similar schools outsidethe programme. After careful examination of the key features of theschools involved, i.e. single sex/co-ed, size and management type(Maintained, Controlled, Integrated or other), your school has beenidentified as a possible match for a school in the experimentalgroup. I am therefore writing to ask if you would consider allowingyour school to be involved in this evaluation.

Schoolswho agree to participate (control schools) will receive personalised,individual feedback on the performance of their pupils in relation tothe aggregate patterns of the experimental and control schools, plusa copy of the final report. Your results will only be available toyou the school principal to disseminate if you wish to your teachingstaff. No one else will have access to your school’s information.

Tomaintain anonymity, schools and pupils involved with the project willbe allocated a code at the beginning of the project. All informationwill be held in strictest confidence and presented as aggregates inthe final report, with all identifying features of the experimentaland control schools removed to ensure anonymity.

Ifyou agree to participate, I can assure you that there will be minimumdisruption to the classes involved. A member of the research teamwill administer whole class Caver WRAPS tests to Reception ,Year 1,2and Year 3,5,8 together with a collection of writing samples.

Ihope I will get the opportunity to work with the students.

Thanksand Regards

………

III.Time Table

ACTIVITY

RESPONSIBILITY

DURATION

Administration of Questionnaires, interviewing and collection of completed questionnaires

Researchers

Research assistants

3 weeks

Teaching reading and writing by use of phonic.

Researcher

Research assistants

4 weeks

Assessment and Testing

Researcher

Research Assistants

4 weeks

Data analysis

Researcher

2 days

Editing and final compilation

Researcher

2 days

Final report design and printing

Researcher

2 days